2. Who To Notify

In addition to online “verbal” abuse, threats and harassment, victims of doxxing are also at risk of offline harassment and identity theft which can result in real financial and reputational damage. When researching a user during a doxxing, that user’s Social Security Number(SSN) can often be discovered. While this identifier was never intended to become a universal identifier for business and commerce, knowing this vital bit of information plus personal details researched from a variety of sources can somtimes help attackers gain access to otherwise secure accounts (see notes on Spokeo, a site popular with identity thieves and hackers).

Notifying the authorities and employers, financial institutions, and service providers quickly and clearly can help reduce the damage footprint.

Authorities and Employers

  • Call your local police department (not 911), give them your address and ask them to watch for potential fake calls/reports (called SWATting )
  • Your employer. Victims have been let go from positions after bogus complaints/reports were called in by harassers. Let your employer know that this is happening and... (?)

Banks

Contact your bank via the identity theft or fraud departments, and inform them what’s happening and request a safe word on the account.

Credit Cards/Credit Bureaus

Start with the credit bureaus: The FTC has a guide on how to Place A Fraud Alert with one of the major credit bureaus.

“Ask 1 of the 3 credit reporting companies to put a fraud alert on your credit report. They must tell the other 2 companies. An initial fraud alert can make it harder for an identity thief to open more accounts in your name. The alert lasts 90 days but you can renew it.” [FTC]

The guide has a helpful checklist to follow.

Medical Providers

Cell Provider

Reporting fraud/identity theft:

Internet Provider

Sources

[FTC]The FTC, Place a Fraud Alert